ReTRIeVIA

:: trivia retrieved ::

Archive for April 2009

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Sri Mariamman Temple

Gazetted as a national monument in 1973.

The Sri Mariamman Temple in Chinatown is Singapore’s oldest Indian temple. It dates back to 1827 with a simple building put up by Naraina Pillai.

In the Sri Mariamman Temple one can see many statues of cows. The cow is sacred to Indians.

Next to the Sri Mariamman Temple is the Jamae Mosque, built between 1830 and 1835.

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Written by victorkoo

30 April, 2009 at 1:00 pm

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Nagore Durgha Shrine

Gazetted as a national monument in 1974.

The Nagore Durgha Shrine was built by Indian Muslims in 1828-1830 and named in honour of Shahul Hamid Durgha of Nagore, South India.

The Nagore Durgha Shrine stands in Telok Ayer Street with three other places of worship: Thian Hock Keng Temple, Al-Abrar Mosque and Telok Ayer Methodist Church.

Written by victorkoo

27 April, 2009 at 1:00 pm

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Hajjah Fatimah Mosque

Gazetted as a national monument in 1973.

The Hajjah Fatimah Mosque was built in 1845-1846. Hajjah Fatimah donated the land and money for building the mosque.

The mosque has a steeple-like minaret that appears to be slanting about 6 degrees from the vertical.

The Hajjah Fatimah Mosque is a short walk away from the famous Sultan Mosque and the historic Malay heritage area of Kampong Glam.

Written by victorkoo

23 April, 2009 at 1:00 pm

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Abdul Gaffoor Mosque

Gazetted as a national monument in 1979.

The Abdul Gaffoor Mosque in Dunlop Street at the Rochor Canal Road end of ‘Little India’, began as a small simple mosque in 1859. Work on the present mosque began in 1907.

The Abdul Gaffoor Mosque is a short walk away from the Church of Our Lady of Lourdes in Ophir Road and the Kwan Im Temple and the Sri Krishnan Temple in Waterloo Street.

Written by victorkoo

20 April, 2009 at 1:00 pm

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Hong San See Temple

Gazetted as a national monument in 1978.

The Hong San See Temple was originally in Tanjong Pagar in 1829. However, the temple was demolished for road expansion in 1907. The new temple was then built on high ground in Mohamed Sultan Road.

The Hong San See Temple, which serves the Chinese community, is a short walk away from the Sri Thendandayuthapani Temple in Tank Road.

Written by victorkoo

17 April, 2009 at 1:00 pm

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Thian Hock Keng Temple

Gazetted as a national monument in 1973.

The Thian Hock Keng Temple, started in 1821, is the oldest Chinese temple in Singapore.

In his temple the new immigrants from China would offer thanks for reaching Singapore safely (sea travel was very risky in those days).

The well-known philanthropist Tan Tock Seng gave the biggest donation in the building of the present temple in 1839-1842.



Written by victorkoo

13 April, 2009 at 1:00 pm

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Syonan Jinja – Japanese temple

Marked as a historical site in 2002

The earliest stamp showing a place of worship in Singapore featured the Japanese temple known as the Syonan Jinja. This temple was built during Japanese rule in Singapore (1942-1945).

Located in the MacRitchie Reservoir forest, visitors to the Syonan Jinja temple had to cross a 100-metre bridge. Today, only the granite components of the temple and the bridge supports remain.

Written by victorkoo

9 April, 2009 at 1:00 pm