ReTRIeVIA

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Posts Tagged ‘transport

Backcover – End Of Transport Book

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Children’s books co-authored by Tan Wee Kiat

dr.wktan@gmail.com

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Written by victorkoo

26 March, 2008 at 10:00 am

Posted in Philatelic Book

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Page 38

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Singapore Philatelic Museum

The Singapore Philatelic Museum showcases Singapore’s stamps,
philatelic materials, and postal artefacts dating back to the
Straits Settlements as well as the rare collections of private
collectors. It promotes interest and appreciation of Singapore’s
history and heritage through philately.

Singapore Post (SingPost)

SingPost has a special service for those who wish to collect
stamps in every new issue. This is done by becoming
a Standing Order Deposit Account (SODA) member.
An added bonus for SODA members is free entry to the
Singapore Philatelic Museum.

Written by victorkoo

25 March, 2008 at 10:00 am

Posted in Philatelic Book

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Page 37 – Addendum

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Apologies: For adding a note after the Ending Note.

After this “Horse-powered & Man-powered Transport” book was published, a reader pointed out that the co-authors had committed a grave sin of omission:

That all the different modes of transport described in the book dealt with Land Transport and we had missed out Man-powered Water Transport.

Luckily, it is easy to rectify this mistake when it is a blog and not a book. So, for our readers, we add this note for stamps of Man-powered Water Transport.

Written by victorkoo

24 March, 2008 at 10:00 am

Posted in Philatelic Book

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Page 36

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REFERENCES

Read more about early Singapore from the following books in your
neighbourhood library.

Singapore Story: Memoirs of Lee Kuan Yew
Published in 1998 by Times Editions Pte Ltd

Singapore Story: From Third World to First
Published in 2000 by Times Media Pte Ltd

Singapore: Journey into Nationhood
Co-published in 1998 by National Heritage Board and Landmark Books Pte Ltd

Singapore: The Encyclopedia
Published in 2006 by Editions Didier Millet and National Heritage Board

Singapore: A Pictorial History 1819-2000
Published in 1999 by Archipelago Press

Written by victorkoo

23 March, 2008 at 10:00 am

Posted in Philatelic Book

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Page 35

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Ending Note

The transporting of goods and passengers by muscle-powered vehicles may
have been slow and laborious but it had its good points. For one thing, traffic
accidents were practically unheard of in the days of muscle-powered transport.

Granted, some injuries might have resulted from the rare occasions of sleepy
riders who fell off the bullock carts; or unwary horse-carriage drivers who were
kicked by agitated horses; or the careless rickshaw pullers who sprained their
ankles after stepping on a loose pebble. But that was about all and the injuries
were seldom fatal.

Granted, too, there would be a need to clean up the inevitable droppings of
horses and bullocks but such generous offerings could be put to good use as
fertiliser for growing and nourishing the plants in our Garden City.

Yes, with muscle-powered modes of transport, we can also put into practice
the wise Chinese advice for a safe journey when our guests take their leave:

‘慢慢走’ which literally means “Slow, slow, go”.

Written by victorkoo

22 March, 2008 at 10:00 am

Posted in Philatelic Book

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Page 34

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Today, trishaws are still seen in many other parts of the world. Notice that the
designs of the trishaw can vary. In one design, the rider is seated in front of
the passenger. In another design, the rider is seated behind the passenger.

In the case of a Singapore trishaw, the rider is seated on the side of the
passenger. As can be expected, this arrangement facilitates conversation
when the passenger is a tourist.

Written by victorkoo

21 March, 2008 at 10:00 am

Posted in Philatelic Book

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Page 33

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Touring-by-trishaw is a popular way of seeing older parts of the city.
It is not unusual to see a big group of Japanese tourists in a trishaw
convoy, with two tourists seated in one trishaw. You can hear,
before you see, a trishaw convoy as there will be loud music blaring
from the trishaw’s radio system.

Favourite routes for trishaw tours are in Chinatown, Little India and
the Malay heritage area of Kampong Glam near Raffles Hotel.

Written by victorkoo

20 March, 2008 at 10:00 am

Posted in Philatelic Book

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